Tuesday’s Tidbit – Frederick William George

There’s some consolation in knowing that even if Rick’s father Fred had been in contact with his father Fred, Rick would have never met his grandfather because he died in 1951, two years before Rick was born. His older sisters Susan and Lynn might have met him but they would have been too young to remember.

I was frustrated when I tried to find Frederick William George’s obituary on Ancestry.com because there was a gap in the digitized versions of the East Liverpool Review that were available. I was happy to find the issue I needed on another site – Newspapers.com – during my 7-day free trial period.

Here’s what I found

FWG.obit.ELOEveningReview.19Nov1951

It seems that in death the secret of his sons from his first marriage was finally out because here’s what appeared on the continuation of his obituary.

FWG.obit.ELO.EveningReview.p5.19Nov1951

I never knew that Dad (Frederick William George, Jr.) was stationed in Norfolk, VA, but I did know that around this time he was assigned to the Sixth Fleet and had been on a tour of duty in the Mediterranean. I also didn’t know that Richard and Jerry were both in San Francisco. Richard went to law school at University of California, Berkeley, School of Law so this may have been where he was in 1951.

There’s another mention of Fred’s illness that appeared in the paper about six weeks before he died. It is copied below. Unlike most of the George men who died young, Fred did not die of heart disease. He had Hodgkin’s Lymphoma – a form of cancer that affects the white blood cells and today is very treatable.  Ironically, Fred’s grandson, Rick, did his PhD dissertation on Interleukin 2 – a cytokine – or protein – that regulates white blood cells.

FWG.illness.10.5.1951

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Tuesday’s Tidbit – Frederick William George

  1. Fascinating. I didn’t remember my dad’s obit mentioning the 3 older sons. I do remember the newspaper laying on the coffee table and when I looked down over the upstairs banister, I saw his photograph looking up at me. That’s when I had a meltdown. My daddy was really gone. Until that time I had not comprehended what had really happened.

    Thanks for doing all this, Kalen. We have all benefited from your tireless work. ❤️

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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    • Lynnette –
      I can’t imagine losing your father when you were so young. I remember a similar experience when I was 16 and my beloved grandfather died. Nana and Buck took care of me while my mother was in the Navy and working and even though I knew he had died (he’d been in the hospital almost 6 weeks) it didn’t really sink in until I saw Nana crying at his funeral. That’s when I had my meltdown – it was terrible.

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