Rick George’s Fourth Great Grandparents’ Marriage Record

Record #14 in the Archivio Di Stato L’Aquila Stato Civile (1809-1865), Registro Degli Atti Di Matrimonio No. 1383, Communedi Castel di Sangro, Anno 1830.  http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/v/Archivio+di+Stato+di+LAquila/Stato+civile+della+restaurazione/Castel+di+Sangro/Matrimoni/1830/1383/004961707_00403.jpg.html?g2_imageViewsIndex=0

Here we have the 1830 marriage record for Guiseppe Iacobucci and Custode Carlone – the parents of Agostino Iacobucci and grandparents of our favorite ancestor – Custode Iacobucci.

I’m grateful because not only did Wilberta send me the link to be able to read the records on line, but she also sent a translation of the important information.

Guiseppe Iacobucci, 29, a shepherd, son of Romualdo Iacobucci, a shepherd and  Lucia Di Sciullo, a spinner (gotta do something with all that wool your shepherd husband brings home!) promises to marry Custode Carlone, 26 (wow – only a 3-year age difference -one of the closest I’ve seen) daughter of Guiseppe Carlone (deceased) and Elisabetta Rosatozzi.

So there you have it – something further back than 1857 – thanks to Wilberta’s mastery of Italian records and language, the foresight of the civil servants in Italy who kept such records and the wisdom of whoever made the push to get these records online.

As you can see from the title of the book (1809 – 1865) we can probably find official records to take us back one generation further but you can see that it is definitely a weekend project. Even the par that is typed and easy to read is in Italian and then you have the handwriting which has to be deciphered. Take a look at Elisbetta Rosatozzi. In case you having trouble finding it – it is on the left hand page and begins at the end of the third line up from the paragraph that begins with “I qualialla presenza …”

The handwritten word at the end of that third line which looks like “Elida” is actually “Elisa.” Dropping down a line you continue with her name “betta” which is actually easy to read. But I can assure you that without Bert’s help I would never have gotten “Rosatozzi” out of the next word which looks like Vodatozzi to me.

What in the world is going to happen in the next few generations who can’t even read modern script?

PRACTICE – PRACTICE – PRACTICE – my mantra.

So it looks like my husband descends from a long line of shepherds, and he is delighted to know this. And our daughter who still carries the name Elisabetta as her middle name – Elizabeth – thinks its pretty cool to share a name with her 5th great grandmother. And our son, who has been texting me about all of these discoveries this evening, seems genuinely impressed and had dubbed me a genealogy Genie. High praise in my book – I’ll take it!

And as for my new favorite female ancestor – Elisabetta Rosatozzi?  I just like the sound of her name. Rosa Tozzi! (emphasis on the zz). It sounds like rosy toesies which is so darn cute. Too bad I translated it and found out that tozzi means “stocky.” So instead of an ancestor with cute little rosy toes, she was probably just round and red.

Once again – I’ll take it! It still sounds neat – (especially when you emphasize the zz.)

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6 thoughts on “Rick George’s Fourth Great Grandparents’ Marriage Record

  1. I’m with Rick in that I love the thought of our ancestors being shepherds and spinners. There is something very peaceful and introspective about that life style. What’s kind of fun is to download Google Earth and actually “go” to Castel Di Sangro and see the mountains and valleys where may have walked and tended their flocks.

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  2. It would be interesting to find out if their farm is now an agriturismo. There are many in Abruzzi. I’d love to go and stay there and help out with the chores. It would be going full circle.

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  3. Round and red! So THAT’s where I get it! That is quite the detective work, Kalen. ‘Interesting’ doesn’t begin to describe what you have been able to uncover. Wow. Wow. Wow.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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